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Subareolar abscess

Abscess - areolar gland; Areolar gland abscess; Breast abscess - subareolar

Subareolar abscess is an abscess, or growth, on the areolar gland. The areolar gland is located in the breast under or below the areola (colored area around the nipple).

Causes

Subareolar abscess is caused by a blockage of the small glands or ducts below the skin of the areola. This blockage leads to infection of the glands.

This is an uncommon problem. It affects younger or middle-aged women who are not breastfeeding. Risk factors include:

  • Diabetes
  • Nipple piercing
  • Smoking

Symptoms

Symptoms of an areolar abscess are:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will perform a breast exam. Sometimes an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

Treatment

Subareolar abscesses are treated with antibiotics and by opening and draining the infected tissue. This can be done in a doctor's office with local numbing medicine. If the abscess returns, the affected glands should be surgically removed. The abscess can also be drained using a sterile needle. This is often done under ultrasound guidance.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outlook is good after the abscess is drained.

Possible Complications

Subareolar abscess may return until the affected gland is surgically removed. Any infection in a female who is not nursing has the potential to be a rare cancer. You may need to have a biopsy or other tests if standard treatment fails.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Contact your provider if you develop a painful lump under your nipple or areola. It is very important to have your provider evaluate any breast mass.

References

Dabbs DJ, Weidner N. Infections of the breast. In: Dabbs DJ, ed. Breast Pathology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 3.

Gollapalli V, Liao J, Dudakovic A, Sugg SL, Scott-Conner CE, Weigel RJ, eds. Risk factors for development and recurrence of primary breast abscesses. J Am Coll Surg. 2010;211(1):41-48. PMID: 20610247 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20610247.

Hunt KK, Mittendorf EA. Diseases of the breast. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2017:chap 34.

    • Normal female breast anatomy

      Normal female breast anatomy - illustration

      The female breast is composed mainly of fatty tissue interspersed with fibrous or connective tissue. The circular region around the nipple is often a different color or pigmented. This region is called the areola.

      Normal female breast anatomy

      illustration

      • Normal female breast anatomy

        Normal female breast anatomy - illustration

        The female breast is composed mainly of fatty tissue interspersed with fibrous or connective tissue. The circular region around the nipple is often a different color or pigmented. This region is called the areola.

        Normal female breast anatomy

        illustration

      Review Date: 10/4/2016

      Reviewed By: John D. Jacobson, MD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda Center for Fertility, Loma Linda, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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